Monthly Archives: November, 2013

What’s Wrong with Money in Politics?

What’s wrong with Money in Politics?

  1. Moneyed interests are often unconcerned with good government.
  2. Moneyed interests tend to make laws more complicated by inserting their specific (self-interested) demands.  Complex laws make for BIGGER, less efficient government.
  3. Money interests will often encourage government to ‘pick a winner.’
  4. Moneyed interests tend to favor privatizing profits and socializing losses.
  5. Lobbyists, whose expertise is often needed in the legislative process, are now the same people most directly funding the politician’s campaign, thus compromising the objectivity of the exchange.
  6. Lobbyists gain such continued and familiar access to elected officials that policy focus is shifted away from representation of the actual constituency.
  7. Policies not related to money, but instead to issues like family values, civil rights, diversity or conservative social ideals, may be overwhelmed by political deal-making that seeks first and foremost to serve moneyed interests.
  8. Moneyed interests will support incumbent politicians just to gain access to committees or other political allies.  This distorts the actual interests of the voters, and makes voter-instigated change much more difficult.
  9. The job of collecting money is too distracting.  Not all of the players in the ‘arms race’ of campaign financing are willing participants.  Many are dragged along.  Many are rendered ineffective by the demands of constant campaigning and fundraising.  This issue goes WAY beyond a simplistic case of ‘quid pro quo.’ This is systemic corruption.
  10. Money is NOT free speech.  Money is just a volume knob on certain speech from certain political special interests.
  11. Corporate personhood, when combined with America’s treaty law, can actually result in the surrender of the sovereignty of federal, state and local governments to foreign moneyed interests.
  12. Small businesses, the engine of the Main Street economy, find that they now need to compete not only in the marketplace but in the in political arena.  More than two-thirds of all small business owners disagree with Citizens United and even more complain that money in politics is bad for business.
  13. Money in Politics corrupts the fundamental vision of a democracy by and for the PEOPLE.

While money in politics does not always come from what we might all agree is a “moneyed interest,” it is important to understand that the distorting effects of money can be just as damaging in the hands of those with the best of intentions.  The complaint here is not that those with money are wrong.  It is the role of money itself that is wrong.  Money should not be the final authority in determining what is discussed, what is heard, what is right or wrong or implemented or ignored.

SAY IT! Mr. President

I think it’s time to start pointing the corruption issue directly at the president. No, I’m not accusing Barack Obama of hiding bags of money in his freezer, nor am I complaining about corporate friendly policies he’s backed, although he’s backed some that have been troubling.  But thinking strategically, we should be holding Obama to his own words on money in politics and lobbying. In “Republic, Lost,” Lawrence Lessig waxes poetic about Obama’s encouraging rhetoric leading into the 2008 election.  And then Lessig points dismally to what really transpired.

To me this was always one of the singularly more promising aspects of candidate Obama and I KNOW personally several libertarians and conservatives who voted for him on that basis alone. The media hyped up Obama’s lyrical pronouncements – stuff about changing the business-as-usual culture in Washington and shutting the revolving door to K-Street, but the media had no interest in the real underlying promise. As soon as Obama was elected, we were right back to chasing one crisis after another and picking deeply partisan sides on everything. Why should the media have pressed Obama? The money wars are fought within the framework of media. They’re the beneficiaries. Only Obama himself can change the narrative.

So it seems that reaching Obama could matter. It takes 100,000 signatures to get a response from him directly. What we want is a truly one-issue face-forward press conference promoting his-own campaign promise – a public setting of priorities that puts the corrupting influence of money in politics squarely at the top. Sure the president will be distracted by more crisis-governance in the next few months.  But maybe, just maybe he’ll also consider that setting this priority will allow him to control the narrative and more pieces on the chess board. Who knows, but we can’t complain if we haven’t tried. Please join me in telling the president to SAY IT.

WE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO… SAY IT!

“The number one priority in America should be to reduce the corrupting influence of money in the America political system.”

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/say-it-corrupting-influence-money-politics-must-end-campaign-promise-our-number-one-priority/dQVWLfgg

March Against Corruption

Just a reminder that this weekend is the first ever national demonstration against the corrupting influence of money in politics.  The March Against Corruption is happening on Saturday, November 2nd , in cities all across America (and even internationally).

If this is the first you’ve heard about this march, be sure to watch this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVrf7TmcfiE

In the New Jersey region there are Marches planned in NYC, Philadelphia, Allentown, PA and Wilmington, DE.

http://marchagainstcorruption.com/locations/

Starting at 12:00 noon

Saturday, November 2nd, 2013

In New York City the event starts in Zuccotti Park at 12:00 noon.

In Philadelphia the event starts at 12:00 noon in the Independence Mall at the corner of 5th Street and Market Street (Liberty Bell park lawn). The march concludes at City Hall.

Worldwide Web March Against Corruption

http://marchagainstcorruption.com/

Facebook Headquarters

https://www.facebook.com/MarchAgainstCorruption

Going to the event – you can contact Mark Doenges at 856-906-4447

For an explanation of the underlying problems:

http://www.ted.com/talks/lawrence_lessig_we_the_people_and_the_republic_we_must_reclaim.html